NON-FOOTBALL STORIES 1918

While looking through old documents, it is almost inevitable that the reader's attention will be drawn from the intended target to other articles. Most of the reports below were found in old Glasgow Herald newspapers.  Although they have no football content, they may be of interest.

CASUALTY OF WAR
Killed at sea when HMS Mechanician was torpedoed, Engineer Sub-Lieutenant John Grierson, aged thirty years, husband of Agnes Grierson, 45 Hampden Street, Walton, Liverpool and son of John and Jane Grierson, Ardrossan.
               
Glasgow Herald, 20 January 1918

VESSEL TORPEDOED - THE HUMBER
The steel screw steamer Humber built by Ardrossan Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company for E P Hutchinson, Hull, and launched on 21 October 1899, while on a voyage from King’s Lynn to Dunston-on-Tyne, with a cargo of wheat, was torpedoed east of Sunderland by U-Boat 34, and seven lives lost.
               
Glasgow Herald, 25 January 1918

CASUALTY OF WAR - HUGH LYNCH

Private Hugh Lynch, Labour Corps and formerly Royal Scots Fusiliers, son of Mr Hugh and Mrs Elizabeth Jordan Lynch, 30 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 27 February 1918

DEATH ON SERVICE - JAMES GRAY

Posted missing on the 3 May, 1917, now officially presumed killed on that date, Private James Gray, Royal Scots, late of Garrioch Dairy, Maryhill, eldest son of James Gray now of Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 4 March 1918


HUGH LYNCH

Private Hugh Lynch, Royal Scot Fusiliers, eldest son of Mr Hugh Lynch, 30 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan died on Wednesday of last week (20 February 1918) at Stobhill Military Hospital. He joined the army in 1914 and saw considerable service in France. About eighteen months ago he was wounded, and was invalided home. Later he returned to duty but he never recovered sufficiently to be sent to the front again. He took ill and was sent to Stobhill Hospital where, as stated, he died.  Private Lynch was a native of Ardrossan and was educated at Saint Mary’s School, Saltcoats. He served his time at the baking trade with Mr Conn but afterwards worked in Nobel’s Factory and at the harbour. His body was brought to Ardrossan last Saturday (22 February 1918) and he was buried with full military honours on Saturday afternoon (2 March 1918) in Ardrossan Cemetery. There was a large turnout of the Ardrossan Detachment of Volunteers under Lieutenant Price and the cortege was headed by a piper.  The Reverend Father Power conducted the service at the graveside. A firing party from the Volunteers fired the salute and The Last Post was sounded on the bugle.

                Ardrossan and Saltcoats Herald, 8 March 1918

DEATH ON SERVICE - JOHN McKIRDY
Previously reported missing on 27 August 1917, now presumed killed in action, Private John McKirdy, the Welsh Regiment, beloved husband of Mary Conn, 12 Seton Street, Ardrossan and only son of the late Councillor McKirdy, Saltcoats.
                Glasgow Herald, 9 March 1918

 

VESSEL SEIZED - THE ORMEA

The steel screw steamer Ormea, later named the Alfred Nobel, the Adagena and the Ada Gena, originally built by Ardrossan Shipbuilding Company Limited for William Hutcheson, Bute and launched on 27 August 1888 was seized by German forces at Odessa and taken into the German naval service.

                Glasgow Herald, 13 March 1918

 

LAUNCH AT ARDROSSAN - THE BADMINTON

The naval minesweeper Badminton – 230 feet in length, 28 feet in breadth, and 7 feet in depth – built by Ardrossan Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company Limited for The Admiralty, London, was launched on the above date.

                Glasgow Herald, 18 March 1918

 

MOVEMENT IN THE CIVIL SERVICE

The following movement in the Custom and Excise Department is officially notified - Mr J Erskine, officer from Dumbarton 1st Station, to Ardrossan Station, temporarily.

                Glasgow Herald, 19 March 1918

CASUALTY OF WAR - ALFRED JONES

Killed in action, Private Alfred Jones, aged thirty-four years, Australian Infantry – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of Charles West Jones and Agnes Jones, 19 Seton Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 23 March 1918
 

CASUALTY OF WAR - JAMES HUNTER

Killed in action, Private James Hunter, aged twenty-two years, 2nd Battalion Cameronians – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of James and Margaret Hunter, Townhead of Montfode, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 24 March 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR - ROBERT ANDREW BRUCE

Robert Andrew Bruce served with the Royal Scots Fusiliers, Service Number 28940. He was discharged from the Army as medically unfit as a chronic condition he suffered from was aggravated by ordinary military service. He received a pension from the Army.  Robert lived at Seafield Cottage, Ardrossan. His parents were Robert and Isabella, nee Hislop. He died on 25 March 1918, at home, of a gastric haemorrhage caused by the condition, chronic splenic anaemia. He was twenty-one years old and a shipping clerk.

                Glasgow Herald, 25 March 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR - ARTHUR MATHIESON RODMAN

Died of wound, Sergeant Arthur Mathieson Rodman, Black Watch – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – husband of Lily Ward or Rodman, 22 Winton Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 25 March 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR - ANDREW KEAN

Died of wounds, Private Andrew Kean, aged twenty-six years, Gordon Highlanders – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – only son of Mr Andrew and Mrs Isabella Kean, 72 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 29 March 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR - THOMAS HOWIE SMITH

Killed in action, Private Thomas Howie Smith, Royal Scots Fusiliers – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of the late Mr and Mrs Smith, 83 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 9 April 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR - JOHN MacDOWALL

Killed in action, Lance Corporal John MacDowall, South African Infantry – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – third son of Mrs and the late Mr David MacDowall, Mayfield, North Crescent, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 11 April 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR - JOHN ORR MILLER

Killed in action, Private John Orr Miller, Highland Light Infantry – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of the late Adam and Mrs Miller, 50 Princes Street, Ardrossan and sister of Mrs Janet R B Miller.

                Glasgow Herald, 16 April 1918

 

VESSEL MINED - THE BLACKMOREVALE

The naval minesweeper Blackmorevale, built by Ardrossan Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company Limited for the Admiralty and launched on 23 March 1917, was sunk off Montrose after striking a mine laid by U-Boat 71.  There were twenty-six casualties.

                Glasgow Herald, 1 May 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR - WILLIAM McINNES

Killed in action, Private William McInnes, aged thirty-two years, 1st Battalion Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – husband of Annie Boyle or McInnes, 21 Harbour Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 8 May 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR - ANDREW SHAW MURRAY

Killed in action, Private Andrew Shaw Murray, New Zealand Entrenching Battalion – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – fifth son of Mary Shaw Murray, 11 Young Street, Ardrossan and the late John Murray and brother of George Murray, Pinkerton, New Zealand.

                Glasgow Herald, 10 May 1918

LAUNCH AT ARDROSSAN

The naval minesweeper Bagshot, built by Ardrossan Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company Limited – 231 feet in length, 28 feet 6 inches wide and 7 feet 6 inches draft – was launched at Ardrossan Harbour.

                Glasgow Herald, 23 May 1918

 

PASSENGER TRAFFIC TO IRELAND

The shipping companies dealing with the Irish passenger traffic have informed the Home Office and local Irish Permit Office that they cannot hold themselves responsible for any passengers holding permits who may be unable to get accommodation on board the steamers.  They point out that passenger accommodation is very limited and will be inadequate to accommodate intending travellers to Ireland in anything like the numbers hitherto carried.   This applies particularly to the evenings of Thursday 11 July, Friday 12 July and Saturday 13 July from Glasgow and Ardrossan to Belfast.  They also point out that they have received notice from the Board of Trade that the number of passengers to be carried per steamer will be substantially reduced.  Members of His Majesty’s Forces in uniform have preference and this also largely reduces the accommodation for civilian passengers.

                Glasgow Herald, 6 July 1918

 

THE EGLINTON MEETING

Eglinton Harriers enjoyed a monopoly of Saturday’s date for their annual gala, and all prominent performers were to be found at Ardrossan.  Winton Park is by no means an ideal enclosure for the expert and this fact may have to some extent accounted for the complete failure of the backmarkers.  Yet it did not prevent the running from evoking enthusiasm, because it did not veto splendidly close finishes. In particular, the half-mile provided a thrilling termination and no one would have been surprised had the judges inverted the placing of the first two men – Carberry and Parker.  The record crowd of spectators enjoyed the day’s sport and had every reason to be satisfied with the varied programme.

                Glasgow Herald, 22 July 1918

  

CASUALTY OF WAR - WILLIAM IRVINE

Killed in action, Private William Irvine, Black Watch – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – husband of Annie Irvine and father of two children, 77 Kilmahew Street, Ardrossan and son of Robert and Annie Irvine, 29 Gateside Street, West Kilbride.

                Glasgow Herald, 26 July 1918

  

CASUALTY OF WAR - JOHN PETER KERR

Killed in action, Private John Peter Kerr. aged nineteen years, 1/5th Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of Captain and Mrs John Kerr of Aoirenbeg, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 3 August 1918

  
DEATH ON SERVICE - KERR

Reported missing, believed drowned on hospital ship Warilda, Private John P Kerr, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, aged nineteen years, dearly beloved youngest son of Captain and Mrs Kerr, Aoerenberg, Eglinton Road, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 9 August 1918

  

CASUALTY OF WAR - WILLIAM YUILLE

Killed in action, Private William Yuille, aged twenty-one years, The Queens (Royal West Surrey) Regiment – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of John and Jane Yule, 9 McKellar Avenue, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 19 August 1918

  

CASUALTY OF WAR - JAMES McLAREN MORTON

Died of wounds received in action, Gunner James McLaren Morton, aged thirty-eight years, Royal Garrison Artillery – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of the late Mr and Mrs John Morton, Glasgow and husband of Margaret Morton, 131 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 22 August 1918

  

ALLEGED ATTEMPT TO REMOVE FIREARMS TO IRELAND

An indictment has been served on eight persons – four men and four women – who were arrested on 12 July at Ardrossan Harbour on a charge of contravening Defence of the Realm Regulation 18 or the Explosive Substances Act, Section 4.  The accused are Michael Callaghan, Michael Gallacher, William Fullarton, Mary Fullarton, Charles Hilley, Bridget Healey, Rose Ann Healy and Chrissie Little.  It is alleged that the accused, who were in possession of permits to Ireland, attempted to remove firearms, ammunition and explosive substances from Great Britain to Ireland without a permit from the competent naval or military authority.  They will appear before the High Court of Justiciary at Edinburgh on 10 September.

                Glasgow Herald, 24 August 1918

CASUALTY OF WAR - THOMAS CALDWELL

Killed in action, Lance Corporal Thomas Caldwell, aged thirty-one years, Canadian Infantry – Theatre of War, France and Flanders – son of David and Mary Caldwell, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 28 August 1918

 

DEATH ON SERVICE - MORTON
Died on 22 August of wounds received in action, Gunner James Morton, Royal Garrison Artillery, late of Highland Light Infantry, beloved husband of Margaret Agnew, 131 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 28 August 1918

 

SCHOOL DISPUTE AT ARDROSSAN

A piquant situation has arisen in connection with Ardrossan public schools.  Some time ago the Ayrshire Education Authority decided to carry out a scheme involving the fusion of Eglinton School and Winton School, both in Ardrossan.  The former is at present a boys’ school and the latter a girls’ school, and the Authority’s scheme is that Winton School be made a junior school for both boys and girls and Eglinton School a senior school for both boys and girls.  The local School Management Committee, holding that under the Education Act 1918, they had the right to determine what the status of any elementary school should be, refused to acquiesce in the Authority’s proposal and asked the Education Department for an interpretation of that section of the Act on which they based their claim.  At the meeting of the School Management Committee yesterday a letter was read from the Department stating that it was not open to the Department to express authoritative opinions on the legal interpretation of the statutes.  A letter was also submitted from the clerk to the Authority stating that the Authority’s proposal had now been approved by the Department, and that the headmasters of the two schools had been instructed to arrange for the redistribution of the pupils, staffs et cetera at the beginning of the new session (yesterday).  The Chairman, the Reverend D D Rees, said that he had taken it upon himself the responsibility of going to these schools before they opened that morning and preventing the headmasters from transferring the pupils until the committee had met and considered the matter.  The Chairman’s action was homologated and it was agreed to intimate the committee’s action to the Authority and to request the representatives of the latter body to meet with the committee next Monday.

                Glasgow Herald, 4 September 1918

 

EXPLOSIVES FOR IRELAND

Lord Sands presided at the trial yesterday in the High Court of Justiciary, Edinburgh, of four men and four women for a contravention of the Defence of the Realm Act and Regulations.  The charge bore that on 12 July 1918, at Winton Pier, Ardrossan Harbour, Michael Callaghan, Michael Gallacher, William Fullarton, Mary Fullarton, Charles Hilley, Bridget Healey, Rose Ann Healey and Chrissie Little had in their possession permits authorising them to embark for Ireland and cabin and berth tickets from Ardrossan to Belfast and also the following firearms - ammunition and explosive substances, namely one hand grenade, 1440 detonators, 184 revolver ball cartridges, 58 rifle ball cartridges, 15╝lb of monarkite, 35Żlb of gelignite, half a pound of blasting powder, 7 hanks of fuse and two revolvers and attempted to remove the firearms, ammunition, and explosive substances from Great Britain to Ireland without a permit from a competent naval or military authority.  Alternatively the accused were charged under the Explosive Substances Act, 1883, with having knowingly in their possession the articles mentioned under such circumstances as to give rise to a reasonable suspicion that they did not have them in their possession for a lawful purpose.  The Crown were represented by the Solicitor-General, King's Counsel and Mr Mitchell, Advocate Depute and the prisoners by Mr Sanderson, King's Counsel and Mr McGregor Mitchell.  An objection to the relevancy of the complaint was repelled and the accused pleaded not guilty.  Superintendent Anderson, Saltcoats, gave details as to the arrest of the accused at Ardrossan Pier.  Among the baggage were three suit cases, all of considerable weight and containing explosives which on account of their dangerous nature were sent to Nobel’s for storage.  At Ardrossan Police Office, the prisoners were warned and searched.  They were asked if they had a permit from a competent naval or military authority to remove explosives to Ireland.  Callaghan alone replied that they had not.  A pocket-book containing letters was found beside a chair on which one of the accused sat.  Several of the letters were addressed to Callaghan.  One was dated from Liberty Hall, Dublin the headquarters of the Sinn Fein Society.  Another was dated from 17 Church Street, North Wall, Dublin. The writer asked the receiver to bring him a revolver, a rifle, and ammunition, and stated that he was to divide the 'lot' amongst the boys at the holidays.  A third letter, written from ‘Derry advised the receiver to take the parcels as ordinary luggage.  Callaghan had at his house in Glasgow a membership card of the Irish Volunteers.  A number of the accused gave evidence on their own behalf.  Michael Callaghan, twenty-five years of age, said he was born in Ireland and had been in Scotland eight or nine years. He was a steelworker.  He was asked by someone to take the explosives to Ireland.  They were to be given to him before 12 July and he had arranged to take the explosives to Ireland at the Fair Holidays.  He had heard that others of the accused were going to Ireland for the Fair Holidays and, being friends, they travelled together.  Not one of them knew he was taking explosives.  He bought two of the suit cases and the persons mentioned put the explosives into them. He gave a revolver to Gallacher and the pocket-book of letters to Rose Healey to carry as his pockets were full of cigarettes and chocolate boxes.  In cross-examination, Callaghan declined to say who gave him the explosives.  By the Court – none of the other prisoners asked him any questions about the contents of the heavy cases.  He did not know he was offending the law by taking the cases to Ireland.  Michael Gallacher, shoemaker, Townhead; William Fullarton aged twenty-two years, steelworker; Charles Hilleyaged seventeen years, a shunter; Bridget Healey, embroidress and Rose Ann Healey, machinist, all denied they knew the cases contained explosives.  The Solicitor-General withdrew the charges against Mary Fullarton and Chrissie Little.  The jury retired at five past four and returned in twenty-five minutes, finding Callaghan, William Fullarton and Rose Ann Healey guilty as libelled.  Charles Hilley guilty with a recommendation to the leniency of the Court and Bridget Healey not guilty.  Callaghan was sentenced to three years penal servitude.  Gallacher and Fullarton to six months imprisonment and Hilley and Rose Ann Healey to three months imprisonment.  Mary Fullarton, Bridget Healey, and Chrissie Little were discharged.

                Glasgow Herald, 11 September 1918

BIRTH
Rae -  At 11 Princes Street, Ardrossan, on the 5th instant, the wife of Signaller James Rae, Royal Scots Fusiliers,  B E F, France, a son.

                Glasgow Herald, 8 October 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR

Died on service, Driver Patrick McNamee, Royal Horse Artillery – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of Patrick and Bessie McNamee, 13 Harbour Place, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 22 October 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR

Died in service, Private Robert Breckinridge Currie, aged twenty years, 5/6th Battalion Cameronians – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of William and Jeannie Currie, 88 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 23 October 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR

Died in service, Private Adam Carnochan, aged thirty-five years, 6th Battalion Black Watch – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of Mr. and Mrs Carnochan, Ardrossan and husband of Isabella Cowden or Carnochan, 10 Galloway Street, Paisley.

                Glasgow Herald, 24 October 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR

Died on service, Lance Corporal William McLean Dick, aged twenty-seven years, 9th Battalion Black Watch –Theatre of war, France and Flanders – son of Thomas and Elizabeth Dick, 34 Barr Place, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 2 November 1918

 

DEATH ON SERVICE

Anderson - Killed in action, on 21 September, Thomas Hodges Anderson, aged twenty-three years, Scottish Rifles, beloved second son of Mr and Mrs H Anderson, 6 Braco Street, Glasgow and grandson of Mrs Smith, 51 Raise Street, Saltcoats and of the late Bailie Anderson, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 7 November 1918

 

CASUALTY OF WAR

Died in service, Telegraphist John William Munn, aged twenty-one years, R N V R, HMS Ascot - son of James and Elizabeth Spiers Munn, 80 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 10 November 1918

CASUALTY OF WAR

Died on service at Wassigny, France, Private Dugald Dow, 6th Battalion Cameron Highlanders and 10th Company Labour Corps – Theatre of war, France and Flanders – husband of Flora Brown Caldwell or Dow, 117 Glasgow Street, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 24 November 1918

 

DEATH -SHEDDEN
At Crawford Lodge, Ardrossan, on 23 November, William Shedden, engineer, aged fifty-two years.

                Glasgow Herald, 26 November 1918

 

DEATH ON SERVICE

Died at sea of pneumonia, on 13th October, 1918, aged thirty years, Sergeant James Cunningham, American Army, youngest son of Matthew Cunningham, late of Parkcrest, Lanark – inserted by his brother Robert, 1 Westbank Quadrant, Glasgow, late of Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 27 November 1918

 

DEATH - BLACK
At Lily Bank, Eglinton Road, Ardrossan, on 28th November, Catherine McDonald (Reina), on the eve of her twelfth birthday, dearly beloved daughter of Lieutenant James Black, R N V R and Mrs Black.

                Glasgow Herald, 30 November 1918


CASUALTY OF WAR

Died on service in Alexandria, Egypt, Gunner Thomas Gates, Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery – Theatre of war, Egypt – son of Thomas and Mary Frew Gates, 22 Eglinton Road, Ardrossan.

                Glasgow Herald, 7 December 1918